Why Music Analytics Tools Matter for Artist Managers

Artist managers and management teams can, and should, be an artist’s best friend in the music business. The artist-manager relationship is a special one, forged by a fiduciary duty on the part of the manager to advocate for, advise, and represent an artist at every stage of their career.

A big chunk of those responsibilities involve strategy: knowing how well your artist is performing so you can decide where to invest more time and where to scale things back. And with the right analytics tools, you can strike that optimal balance to get the most for your artist, no matter the situation.

A big chunk of those responsibilities involve strategy: knowing how well your artist is performing so you can decide where to invest more time and where to scale things back. And with the right analytics tools, you can strike that optimal balance to get the most for your artist, no matter the situation.

A big chunk of those responsibilities involve strategy: knowing how well your artist is performing so you can decide where to invest more time and where to scale things back. And with the right analytics tools, you can strike that optimal balance to get the most for your artist, no matter the situation.

A big chunk of those responsibilities involve strategy: knowing how well your artist is performing so you can decide where to invest more time and where to scale things back. And with the right analytics tools, you can strike that optimal balance to get the most for your artist, no matter the situation.

Brief History of Artist Management

Artist management in the music industry really established itself in the public consciousness with the ‘60s British Invasion, which brought the Beatles and the Rolling Stones to American shores. And it wasn’t just about the performing and songwriting talent of Lennon-McCartney or Jagger-Richards — their managers played a huge role in strategizing each band’s global domination.

Beatles manager Brian Epstein, informally dubbed “the fifth Beatle,” as a result of his integral role in the band’s development, was responsible for the rebranding of the Beatles from jeans and leather jacket-wearing rascals to professional uniformed performers who would become commonly known as “the Fab Four.”

With Epstein’s leadership and guidance, the Beatles would go from regular gigs at Liverpool’s Cavern Club (100-200 person capacity) to NME’s All-Star Concert at Wembley Arena (12.5K person capacity) in just five years. Epstein was also instrumental in forging a relationship with Parlophone A&R Manager George Martin, who, after much reservation, would go on to produce many of the band’s albums and also become a “fifth Beatle.”

Early Rolling Stones manager Andrew Loog Oldham piggybacked off of Epstein’s success with the Beatles by positioning the Rolling Stones as a “bad boy” alternative to the Fab Four. He even brought John Lennon and Paul McCartney into the studio to write the song “I Wanna Be Your Man” for the Stones, subsequently encouraging Mick Jagger and Keith Richards to start writing their own songs. The result? Next to the Beatles, the Rolling Stones would become one of the biggest Rock bands ever.

The groundwork for this sort of monumental worldwide success with artist management was laid by Jazz managers like John Levy (Nancy Wilson, Cannonball Adderley) and early Pop and Rock managers like Colonel Tom Parker (Gene Austin, Elvis Presley), who probably never dreamed that data analytics would increasingly become a skill set required of artist managers.

Fundamentally, however, whether it’s business acumen, relationship building, or strategic guidance, the fiduciary role of the artist manager hasn’t changed — just some of the tools have.

What Artist Management Looks Like Today

Today, artist management can range from a passionate promoter who knows how to hustle to a corporate backed department with major industry resources at its disposal.

Fortunately, streaming and social media data can act as the great leveler in this regard, offering some of the same real-time insights and strategic opportunities across the board, irrespective of what point an artist is at in their career.

Whether you’re facilitating potential collaborations, making deals with record labels and publishers, negotiating with sync teams, or helping strategize album rollouts, data is behind every door and analytics tools can open each one up even further.

How Chartmetric Can Help

In today’s music business, facilitating collaborations has become one of the best management strategies for growing and diversifying an artist’s audience base.

So, let’s say your newest promising singer-songwriter client is playing a few shows in their favorite city, Paris, and you’re already thinking about their next album. Who could they meet with locally for a few songwriting sessions and possible collaborations to develop their exposure there?

Of the 16K+ cities that we track data for all around the world, let’s hone in on Paris’ City Page. You could start with the “Artist From Here” section, and scan to get an idea of who might be in the area. If it’s not that useful seeing David Guetta here, that’s understandable, given the genre mismatch (unless you’re looking to do a cool EDM/folk crossover), so just quick-search Folk instead.

Out of the 800+ artists we have from Paris, 36 are left with Folk listed as one of their genres. Now, you can sort the Spotify Followers column to look for Paris Folk artists with a similar, but sizable, listener base…. Something between 10K and 100K maybe? Check out their Artist Pages, listen to their music, and reach out!

Who is Chartmetric?

We are a small, highly skilled team with members from diverse backgrounds, and that diversity is celebrated just as much as our work is. We’re talented solo artists, but we’re a much better band. We are as much music data rockstars as we are music superfans, and we thrive as a bridge between music and technology, data and creativity.

Sign up for a free account at chartmetric.com, dive deeper into our features at blog.chartmetric.com, and check them out for yourself. We can’t wait to see what you create.

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